Best Practices

What are best practices?

At the entrance of a waste separation plant in Bogota, this panel shows the basics of IWPARs’ protection: helmets, gloves and masks.
At the entrance of a waste separation plant in Bogota,
this panel shows the basics of IWPARs’ protection:
helmets, gloves and masks

Under the framework of Enda's EC-funded urban environment program, “PRECEUP," Enda Europe observed and compiled a list of best practices. In Bogota in the 1990s, Enda produced and published the first census and helped IWPARs to organise their first public recognition and contracts in connection with the privatization of waste management. Since then, Enda has produced many reports, studies and films...These best practices among others will be used to analyze the progress of other actors and bring new ideas to the table, generate debate among partners and stakeholders, and adapt the methodology of the project IWPAR if necessary.

For us, examples of best practices are operational programs that could either be applied to our program or used to raise important points for reflection. We identify two types of best practices: those seeking the inclusion of IWPARs in a social protection system and those aimed at their integration into a formal waste management system (ideally both). We selected programs in countries in which we could track and analyze the progress of programs in a similar context to that of our countries of operation...


Handouts of best practices

Location-based best practices

Location-based best practices

Best practices publications (pdf)

  1. Egypt-The Zabbaleen Environmental Development Program (ZEDP)
  2. The Vida Limpa Program (Brazil)
  3. National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana
  4. The community-based project SEWA (Self Employed Women’s Association) - India
  5. Cooperatives of recyclers in Colombia: the examples of Recuperar (workers’ cooperatives in Medellin) and Prosperar (Manizales)
  6. Waste Collection in Buenos Aires: Multi-faceted cooperatives
  7. Mozambique, Senegal and Burkina Faso: LVIA Plastic Recycling Centres
  8. Philippines - Metro Manila Linis Ganda Program
  9. India - Pune, KKPKP and SWaCH
  10. South Africa - Durban, the municipality of eThekwini
  11. Brasil - Rio de Janeiro, the cooperative Coopcarmo
  12. Thailand - The Project Baan Mankong and the “Community Organizations Development Institute” (CODI)
  13. Mauritania - Zazou project
  14. Bangladesh - Waste Concern
  15. Rwanda - Mutual Health Insurance
  16. Cambodia – The SKY Program
  17. Senegal - Mutual Healthcare Organizations GRAIM/ENDA GRAF
  18. Tanzania - Mutual Healthcare Organization UMASIDA
  19. Philippines - The Kasapi program
  20. India - Hasiru Dala
  21. Costa Rica - Universal Social Security
  22. Marocco - The RAMED Project

  23. Some definitions

    To better understand the topics of these best practices, here are some definitions:

    Public policy:

    "A combination of one or more collective goals considered necessary or desirable and other measures or actions taken, even partially, by an institution or a state agency with the purpose of orienting individual or group behaviors, in order to change a situation perceived as unsatisfactory."

    Source: Roth Deubel André-Noël. Politicas publicas, formulacion, implementacion y evaluacion. Ediciones Aurora. Bogota, 1999.

    Permanent professional recyclers:

    "People for whom the majority of income is generated from  recycling activity, part of a certain continuity and tradition, and who are relatively specialized, such as in sorting and commercializing certain materials, who have business relations with major producers of recyclable waste, and have a thorough knowledge of the city, in terms of sources of recyclable materials."

    Source: Silvestre Angela, Antolinez Alexander, Parra Federico. Ojo al Plan Maestro. Una mirada critica al Plan Maestro para el Manejo Integral de los Residuos. Enda América Latina. 2004.

    Temporary professional recyclers:

    "People who have recently started  recycling activity and initially saw a temporary activity but with a view to sustainability."

    Source: Silvestre Angela, Antolinez Alexander, Parra Federico. Ojo al Plan Maestro. Una mirada critica al Plan Maestro para el Manejo Integral de los Residuos. Enda América Latina. 2004.

    Gleaners:

    "Persons who survive by moving from one activity to another. These activities  do not require specialization. These people  experience a significant occupational instability and generate income through diverse activities that are not all related to the recycling business."

    Source: Silvestre Angela, Antolinez Alexander, Parra Federico. Ojo al Plan Maestro. Una mirada critica al Plan Maestro para el Manejo Integral de los Residuos. Enda América Latina. 2004.

    Informal work:

    "Work or activity carried out by people working in informal companies, or by employees of formal companies whose employment is neither regulated nor stable nor secure. Temporary workers can be part of this category"<

    Source: International Labour Organisation (ILO)

    Organized recyclers:

    "recyclers that are part of a formal organization and legally registered, such as in a cooperative, an association, a mutual health insurance group…"

    Source: Silvestre Angela, Antolinez Alexander, Parra Federico. Ojo al Plan Maestro. Una mirada critica al Plan Maestro para el Manejo Integral de los Residuos. Enda América Latina. 2004.

    Independent recyclers:

    "recyclers who are not part of a formal organization and not legally registered, such as in a cooperative, an association a mutual health insurance group…". Note that these recyclers prefer the term "independent" to "unorganized" to emphasize their freedom and opposition to the order of organization. "

    Source: Silvestre Angela, Antolinez Alexander, Parra Federico. Ojo al Plan Maestro. Una mirada critica al Plan Maestro para el Manejo Integral de los Residuos. Enda América Latina. 2004.

    Social exclusion

    "A situation of  economic, professional, political, or social disadvantage  resulting from the difficulty of a person or group to fit into a social system"

    Source: Royal Academy of Spain

    Social security

    All the services a company provides to citizens or households through public and collective measures in order to guarantee a standard of living and a minimum dignity, and protect against the loss or decline of living standards due to some known risks or basic needs"

    Source: Van Ginneken, Wouter. Extending social security: policies for developing countries. Revista internacional del trabajo, vol. 122 (2003), number 3.2003, p.308.

    Social inclusion

    "Process ensuring that people at risk of poverty and social exclusion gain the opportunities and resources to fully participate in economic, social and cultural life and enjoy a standard of living and well-being considered as normal for the society in which they live. Social inclusion ensures that they have greater participation in the decision-making processes that affect their lives and a better access to their fundamental rights".

    Source: Definition given by the European Commission as part of the implementation of the Lisbon strategy in Document of cross-disciplinary French policy, the draft budget law for 2011 - Social inclusion, p 9.

    What is waste management?

    Waste, as defined in the French Environmental Code is"any residue of a process of production, processing or use, any substance, material, product or more generally any personal property abandoned or which its holder intends to neglect "(Article L 541-1 of the Environmental Code). The waste sources may be industrial or domestic. Waste management is the process that integrates the production of waste to treatment. The objective is to regulate waste material at the end its end of life to limit the nuisance,  congestion, and risks related to their hazardous nature which could have health or environmental impacts. Waste management should include strategies for waste minimization and waste separation at the source, for instance by using differentiated colored waste bins (organic, recyclable, toxic ...).


    Our financial partners

    European Commission German Ministry of Education Research French Ministry of Employment (CNASEA) Geneva Third World RAJA Fondation Grupo Familia Fondation Logo CDC Solidarity Developpement Logo

    European Commission, German Ministry of Education, Research, French Ministry of Employment (CNASEA), Geneva Third World,
    the Raja Foundation, the Grupo Familia Fondation and the CDC Solidarity Developpement association.